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Introduction to Directorate General Of Transit Trade

Overview

By virtue of its geographical position, the importance that Pakistan has cannot be undermined. Pakistan’s geostrategic advantage lies in the fact that it shares borders with Iran, Afghanistan, China and India while Arabian Sea connects it to the rest of the world. This advantage has not only evoked much interest among the major powers of the globe but also promoted multi-lateral trade with neighboring countries. Pakistan, therefore, serves as an essential hub operating as a focal point of logistics to the neighboring states, especially land-locked Afghanistan. 
 
Transit through Pakistan is currently the only viable option for Afghanistan, and both countries have signed Afghan-Pakistan Transit Trade Agreement (APTTA). Pakistan and Afghanistan have also reached an understanding on the broad parameters of Afghan exports to Pakistan and India and the use of Afghan territory for Pakistan’s exports to the Central Asian states. Thus, Pakistan stands on the crossroads of becoming a major trade corridor for tapping the Central Asian markets by virtue of its strategic location with three efficient seaports
 
Pakistan, as an important logistics hub for transit trade will undoubtedly bring prosperity to South Asia along the trade routes and beyond, as nothing opens up an area to economic development better than good transportation networks with good transit rules and an ability to transport goods and people effectively.
 

Introduction

The Establishment of Directorate General of Transit Trade serves to facilitate bilateral trade between Pakistan and its neighbouring land-locked countries, thus converting Pakistan into a “land bridge” between South Asia and Central Asia. 
 
The Directorate General of Transit Trade (DGTT) has been established on 01.08.2012 vide SRO No.932(I)/2012. DGTT is based at Custom House, Karachi and has its regional offices at Karachi, Peshawar and Quetta. The Director General reports to the Member (Customs), Federal Board of Revenue. The Regional offices of the Directorate General are headed by a Director, and are assisted by Additional Directors, Deputy Directors, Assistant Directors, Superintendents or Principal Appraisers and other officials of Customs.